Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Foods to make in praise of our Blessed FSM, pasta based and otherwise.

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PKMKII
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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby PKMKII » Fri Dec 17, 2010 11:56 am

Also: remember that a turkey will continue to go up in temp for 10-20 minutes after you take it out of the oven. So if the inner-most thermometer reading is still a few degrees low, it's alright to take the bird out.
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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby bacon » Fri Dec 17, 2010 12:44 pm

Of course, my favorite way to cook a turkey is by placing strips of bacon over the top of it while it is roasting. The juice and salts from the bacon helps to keep it moist and yummily.

An overcooked bird is a yucky, tough bird - so keep an eye on the internal temperature and remember what PK said - it will continue to cook - so take it out of the oven when it is at least 10 degrees below the correct cooking temperature.
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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby Arkaeon » Wed Jan 05, 2011 9:20 pm

Congrats and thanks for the report, Roy.

It's always good to hear of other people's experiments. It cuts down on the number of mistakes I make in Mad Scientist mode myself ;)

Happy holiday aftermath week everybody. I think its time to cook something very UNtraditional to balance the cooking karma. >off to the lab!<
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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby Ubi Dubium » Fri Jan 07, 2011 12:33 am

Although it's already too late, and your turkey is done, I had another suggestion, maybe for next year. I usually throw the turkey neck and giblets (except the liver, yuk) into a pot of water to slowly simmer into turkey stock while the bird cooks. You can add the tail also, wingtips, and any fat you trim off the bird. I usually throw in some vegetables and spices, but no salt. Start with a base of the turkey drippings for your gravy, then add the no-salt stock until you have diluted the salt enough to be acceptable.

On a related note, turkeys are North American birds. I know the old British tradition used to be a goose for the holidays. Any idea when you guys on the far side of the pond started eating turkeys? And how common are they as compared with the traditional goose, or other holiday fare? And have you picked up using cranberries with it as well?
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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby Tigger_the_Wing » Fri Jan 07, 2011 12:47 am

Geese are obstreperous birds; I assume that turkeys are less aggressive and thus easier to keep in the ginormous flocks necessary for bulk-feeding to millions of hungry humans.

As for eating turkey with jam, yes, we were doing that when I was a child.

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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby PKMKII » Fri Jan 07, 2011 1:30 am

Don't turkeys have a much lower fat content than geese?
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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby daftbeaker » Fri Jan 07, 2011 1:45 am

PKMKII wrote:Don't turkeys have a much lower fat content than geese?

Yes but the goose fat is traditionally used to make the roast potatoes nice and crispy on the outside.

I'm with Tig, I think the main driving force was turkey being much cheaper than goose.
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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby DavidH » Fri Jan 07, 2011 9:09 am

We used to keep geese when I was a lad. Yes, they are bloody fierce, but no problem when you get the hang of them. My teenage friends had to show how 'hard' they were by going in with our geese; it was a treat to watch a Teddy Boy in his leather jacket running in mortal fear with a goose pecking at his arse.

I think the thing with ducks is that they don't take to intensive battery rearing and so have become relatively more expensive. Chickens and turkeys are now industrially reared in massive sheds and the price has gone right down. There's a bloke in this village that rears chickens 30,000 at a time: 49 days from buying in day-old chicks to selling live birds to the factories. In and out on fleets of lorries. Ah, the good old country ways!

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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby Tigger_the_Wing » Fri Jan 07, 2011 10:05 am

The way to face down a goose/gander is to persuade it that you are a bigger, fiercer goose/gander than it is.

Given that they aren't the most intelligent of creatures, that is surprisingly easy. I certainly never had any problem dominating a strange flock (a common occurance, being a rural taxi driver). Mind you, unlike your Teddy Boy, I had the advantage that I was usually wearing a skirt. Spreading it out with my hands, leaning forward and hissing fiercely always persuaded the gander in charge of the flock to back down and clear the way. I even had one gander, notorious for attacking women in skirts*, flatten itself to the ground at my feet and start 'peep-peeping' like a chick.
:haha:

* They apparently fool the birds, who seem to think that skirts are wings and thus their territory is being invaded by another bird

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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby DavidH » Fri Jan 07, 2011 10:44 am

Precisely. Run at them, neck forward, arms out, hissing loudly. Never fails. But my brother and I never had the extra advantage of a skirt.

BTW do not try this on a swan.

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Re: Christmas Dinner Question for the Chemists.

Postby DavidH » Fri Jan 07, 2011 3:16 pm

Good for Milo! You can see what he's thinking. But if those swans were nesting, they'd have a go at him.


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